Justice for Atrocities


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East Coast Road Trip


Once or twice a year, I do an East Coast road trip from South Carolina, by China bus. I look at faces and hearts as I travel, sometimes in the stink of alcohol, tobacco and sweat. These are the poor people of America, Latinos, Asians, economical blacks a cut above poverty. Some working; each with attitude, mission, distractions. None speak of Trump.

Trump’s new strategic challenge attacks tolerance. Attacks tolerance by 100s of snatch-and-grab arrests, constitutional violations, illegal challenges to sanctuary cities, and forcing local law enforcement officers to act as federal agents in their home communities, undermining local justice.

Because of tolerance, in many cities citizen safety and commerce is up. Theft and robbery are down. In New York, Philly, or DC identities are largely unneeded, and legal income tracks (vending; food, car washing) are available. Tolerance works to give the poor and those in poverty a place in the market. Durham permits pan-handling with a city vest.

Housing for the poor is unavailable in East Coast markets, even as labor and work becomes widely available. The Eastern poor are not priced or permitted out of the labor market the way California and San Francisco does.

The Ninth Amendment winner for community benefits: NY’s Pace park and field (Hester St), a small oval track with scaled playing fields in the middle, in the evenings supporting an Asian community of teens, walkers groups and solo; men groups, students doing homework, traditional dancers.

Favorite foods: fresh squeezed on the spot orange juice, the Bronx. $2. Great fruit, rich, pure juice. Breakfast sandwich, 3 Sisters Grocery, Philly. $4. Crisp deep-fried bacon, perfect grill-top scrambled.

Public Policy: Tax cuts will have no impact here. Tax money doesn’t come into these families hands by the millions or thousands. Nor is the luck of No federal policy of trade, the wall, the promise of inner city empowerment, of better urban policing in evidence. Yet the poorest US sector is one of the fastest growing under Trump. His attacks on tolerance–poor communities’ pillar and organizing principle–destroys real book value.

East Coast poor communities north and south are resisting silently and firmly. Through income sharing, community giving, improved safety (you can get in and out poor communities without great risk), building social institutions (food days) and better value (craft skills, price, and size), small businesses in poor communities are advancing. To survive, albeit multiply; like SC’s BMW, Bosch, and Boeing plants and Belk’s stores, they need economies of scale–savings that come from increasing production (Aldi’s). And land values at true rents.

Notes: Tolerance adds creativity, a path to growth; it anchors trust. Harlem’s 116th St African Market (center aisle/first stall right) has eye stopping African fabrics and carved instruments! Germany is South Carolina’s largest foreign investment-manufacturer. Global scale is a stall, warehouse size or web site. Rent should be indexed, as an aggravate of labor or income.

A Message Of Racism


A disturbing call, left on a professor’s voice mail recounts all of the myths and rants of racism’s worst. Listen with care.

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Georgia sheriff, deputies indicted after body searches of 900 high school students – The Washington Post


For four hours, 40 uniformed officers — the entire staff of the Worth County Sheriff’s Office — fanned through the school in Sylvester, ordering students against the walls of classrooms and hallways, demanding the students hand over their cellphones.

All 900 students were searched, part of a drug sweep ordered by Sheriff Jeff Hobby, according to court documents.

The sheriff did not have a warrant. He had a “target list” of 12 suspected drug users. Only three of the names were in school that day, April 14.

By noon, when cellphones were handed back and classes resumed, no drugs had been found.

Source: Georgia sheriff, deputies indicted after body searches of 900 high school students – The Washington Post