One More Bullet


Would one more bullet do? Would one more bullet be enough for a jury or a prosecutor or even America to realize that the use of force, after firing 137 times, had gone too far? Would one more bullet take away not only my life but my humanity? And remove the consequences from our deaths. Would one more bullet change murder into a senseless tragedy, for which we the victims could receive the sympathy of blame? Would one more bullet let the jury acquit?

Would one more bullet do?  Are there no limits to the incidents and prevalence of official violence against men walking down the street or staying in front of stores or running away or women snatched from cars, and now an officer in reprise of Fred Astarte jumps on the hood of a car and empties a clip through its windshield at two people inside, a man and a woman who must have wondered why is this man dancing on the hood of the car with his foot prints with a gun in his hand, with his brain gone bad firing bullets through the fractured glass, intent on stitching our dying bodies to the stained upholstered seats, how did this reality demand one more bullet how many did the jury need–wouldn’t the other 136 shots do? Would one more be the one that didn’t bleed because we had no blood left?

Bang Bang Bang Bang Bang Bang Bang Bang Bang Bang Bang Bang Bang Bang Bang Bang Bang Bang Bang

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Bang Bang Bang Bang Bang Bang Bang Bang Bang Bang Bang Bang Bang Bang Bang Bang Bang Bang Bang
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Bang Bang                Bang

On this day, when we were no danger, would one more bullet do?

Cleveland Officer Acquitted of Manslaughter in 2012 Deaths – NYTimes.com


A Cleveland police officer who climbed onto the hood of a car and fired repeatedly at its unarmed occupants in 2012 was acquitted of manslaughter on Saturday by an Ohio judge.

The trial of the officer, Michael Brelo, played out amid broader questions about how the police interact with African-Americans and use force, in Cleveland and across the country.

via Cleveland Officer Acquitted of Manslaughter in 2012 Deaths – NYTimes.com.

“In many American places, people are angry with, mistrustful and fearful of the police,” Judge O’Donnell said. “Citizens think the men and women sworn to protect and serve have violated that oath or never meant it in the first place.”