walterrhett:

Read this the post above. Please, leave a comment. It’s really important to have a voice. Please tell what you think. Will you? Thanks.

Originally posted on Diane Ravitch's blog:

Not long ago, I published a post by Carol Jago, a former president of the National Council of Teachers of English, about how to teach the Common Core in English.

The discussion that followed her post was disturbing. Several teachers said that in their school or district there was a strong mandate to cut back on the teaching of literature. This is absurd, and nothing in the Common Core says there should be less literature. Indeed, if you look at reading across all subject areas, the amount of time devoted to teaching literature in the English class should be untouched.

But even more disturbing were several comments by a teacher in Arkansas named Jamie Highfill. Jamie is in her 11th year of teaching in the schools of Fayetteville, Arkansas. Her students have achieved outstanding results. According to her profile on the district home page, her students consistently outperform district…

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About walterrhett

Walter Rhett is a New York Times verified commenter. He writes "Digging Deeper," a blog for Democrats for Progress and his blog, "Walter Rhett" appears in the San Francisco Examiner. The Oxford Dictionary follows him on twitter.
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3 Responses to

  1. George Buzzetti says:

    I read it, so what, there was no information that was useful. We do not even know who this person is. I do not care if Oxford follows him I only care about the issues and where people stand.

    • Sorry! “Read it” actually refers to the post above it! This blogging system puts the intro after posts that are reblogged. Please, Read “Teaching in an Age of Injustice.” Thanks. Sorry for the misdirection! And your inconvenience.

  2. It sounds like a serious case of haterade on the part of the Principal. The fact that this kind of thinking rules the brain of the appointed leader of the school is quite disturbing.
    It’s pretty evident that there is a faction of the U.S. electorate who find knowing things unnecessary and facts to be a threat of some kind. So, to see such an outright suppression of learning in a school is probably more common than I’d like to think about.

    I’m not sure what can be done about whole districts that subscribe to such ignorance. We live in a democracy and if enough ignorant folks band together, you get these kinds of ignorant policies.

    Thanks for posting!

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